Workers Compensation for Delivery Drivers Injured in an Accident

Home delivery meal services are becoming more and more popular these days. Logging onto a website, perusing lists of delicious easy-to-prepare menu items, and having the shipment show up at your doorstep – what could be easier? No more slaving over a hot stove after a long day’s work. The prepared meal delivery services come in all forms and cooking skill levels – they are most often at least partially prepared by the delivery services’ employees, who are busy working over a hot stove for you to enjoy a little more of your evening.

Home-Delivered Meals Are Not Always Convenient For Everyone Involved

Unfortunately for those employees of these home delivery meal services, however, and as was the case with almost a dozen employees of a meal delivery company in the Miami area, they may not always experience the joy of cooking. A malfunctioning exhaust fan system began to make noise and was shut off by an employee. The carbon monoxide levels started to build and, by the time rescue crews reached the business, the carbon monoxide levels were quite high. The affected employees were transported to local hospitals and, thankfully, were all in stable condition and expected to be alright.

Workers’ Compensation Coverage Requirements Depend On Your Type Of Work

Employees are often faced with dangerous working conditions, even at jobs that do not even seem like they would be hazardous. Employees should be able to expect a safe working environment and, by law, they are entitled to that. An employer has the responsibility to provide a safe working environment. Accidents do happen, though, and when they do, an employee has a right to be compensated for losses incurred during a workplace accident. Employers are required in nearly all circumstances to obtain workers’ compensation coverage for their employees. According to Florida’s Division of Workers’ Compensation, there are different coverage requirements for different kinds of industries:

  • In the construction industry, employers who employ at least one employee, either part-time or full-time, must have workers’ compensation coverage. A contractor in the construction industry who subcontracts any or all of their work is required to either have proof of coverage or, in the alternate, obtain a Certificate of Election to be Exempt from all of their subcontractors before any work is started. Special requirements exist for any out-of-state construction employer who has at least one employee, part or full-time, who performs work in Florida. Generally, in these cases, the employer must have coverage through a Florida policy, through an insurance company licensed in Florida.
  • In a non-construction industry, any employer who has at least four part-time or full-time employees must have workers’ compensation coverage. Similar to the special requirements for construction industry employers, these employers must have Florida policies through Florida-licensed insurance companies if they have at least four employees who work in Florida.
  • In the agricultural industry, workers’ compensation coverage is required when an employer has at least six regular employees and/or at least 12 seasonal employees who work for longer than 30 days.

Get Help For Your Work-Related Injuries

If you or someone close to you has been injured in a work-related incident of any type, you need to be able to trust a legal professional to give you reliable information about your rights.  You may be entitled to compensation for your injuries, your lost wages, your medical expenses, and perhaps even pain and suffering. You will not receive what you do not ask for, so contact an experienced workers compensation attorney today to discuss your case and learn how to pursue what you are entitled to.

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